Search
Close this search box.

EN

What You Need to Know About OSHA’s New Electronic Recordkeeping Rule

Table of Contents

As an employer, it’s essential to keep your employees safe and healthy at all times. That’s why it’s crucial to stay up-to-date with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, including their new electronic recordkeeping rule. In this article, we’ll provide you with everything you need to know about this new rule, including its requirements, benefits, and potential drawbacks.

What You Need to Know About OSHA’s New Electronic Recordkeeping Rule

What Is OSHA’s New Electronic Recordkeeping Rule?

OSHA’s new electronic recordkeeping rule requires certain employers to electronically submit their workplace injury and illness data to OSHA. The rule went into effect on January 1, 2017, and applies to all employers with 250 or more employees in industries covered by OSHA’s recordkeeping regulations. Additionally, employers with 20 to 249 employees in certain high-risk industries must also electronically submit their Form 300A data.

The purpose of the rule is to improve workplace safety and health by making injury and illness data easily accessible to both employers and employees. OSHA believes that by tracking and analyzing this data, employers can identify and address potential safety hazards more effectively.

What Are the Requirements of the Rule?

To comply with OSHA’s new electronic recordkeeping rule, employers must do the following:

  1. Establish a system for electronically submitting injury and illness data to OSHA.
  2. Inform employees of their right to report work-related injuries and illnesses without retaliation.
  3. Ensure that the injury and illness data submitted to OSHA is accurate and complete.

Employers must also keep their injury and illness records for at least five years and make them available to employees, former employees, and their representatives upon request.

What Are the Benefits of the Rule?

OSHA’s new electronic recordkeeping rule offers several benefits to both employers and employees. For employers, the rule provides an opportunity to identify and address potential safety hazards more effectively. By analyzing injury and illness data, employers can develop more effective safety programs and training initiatives, which can ultimately lead to a safer and healthier workplace.

For employees, the rule provides greater transparency and accountability when it comes to workplace safety. By making injury and illness data publicly available, employees can better understand the risks associated with their jobs and advocate for safer working conditions.

What Are the Potential Drawbacks of the Rule?

Despite its potential benefits, OSHA’s new electronic recordkeeping rule has also faced criticism from some employers. One of the main concerns is that the rule could lead to an increase in retaliation against employees who report workplace injuries and illnesses. Some employers worry that by making injury and illness data publicly available, employees could be hesitant to report injuries and illnesses, fearing retaliation.

Additionally, some employers have expressed concerns about the cost and administrative burden of complying with the rule. Establishing a system for electronically submitting injury and illness data can be expensive, and some employers may struggle to find the resources to implement such a system.

Conclusion

In conclusion, OSHA’s new electronic recordkeeping rule is an important regulation that aims to improve workplace safety and health by making injury and illness data more accessible. While the rule has faced criticism from some employers, its potential benefits cannot be ignored. By complying with the rule and establishing effective safety programs and training initiatives, employers can create a safer and healthier workplace for their employees.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Related News

Latest News

Don't Miss Our Updates